A Work In Progress by Connor Franta

22886113In this intimate memoir of life beyond the camera, Connor Franta shares the lessons he has learned on his journey from small-town boy to Internet sensation so far.

Here, Connor offers a look at his Midwestern upbringing as one of four children in the home and one of five in the classroom; his struggles with identity, body image, and sexuality in his teen years; and his decision to finally pursue his creative and artistic passions in his early twenties, setting up his thrilling career as a YouTube personality, philanthropist, entrepreneur, and tastemaker.

Exploring his past with insight and humor, his present with humility, and his future with hope, Connor reveals his private struggles while providing heartfelt words of wisdom for young adults. His words will resonate with anyone coming of age in the digital era, but at the core is a timeless message for people of all ages: don’t be afraid to be yourself and to go after what you truly want.

This full-color collection includes photography and childhood clippings provided by Connor and is a must-have for anyone inspired by his journey.


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After reading Binge, I kind of went on a YouTuber autobiography frenzy. So I picked up Connor Franta’s A Work in Progress as I enjoyed a few of his videos and accidentally bought an Amazon credit. To sum it up, it was pretty forgettable and I can’t really remember much of it. His life stories and advice were both told in a tone that is way more dramatic than what it actually is.

Normal and privileged

Connor is privileged, and I can say so myself as I am as privileged. He lives a life with almost no adversity with a perfectly whole family that a lot of people could only dream of. I don’t think there is anything wrong with being privileged, but the normality that comes with being privileged is the lack of a better term, boring.
Now, I’m sure everyone’s lives are meaningful them and those around them, but a memoir is intended to be a life story written for everyone, and Connor Franta’s life story is just not that interesting compared to people who have either big ups and downs or experienced something unusual. Yes, being a YouTube sensation isn’t ordinary, but with basically every single YouTuber coming out with a book, Connor’s just doesn’t stand out.

It took me a couple of hours to finish the book but it sure didn’t feel like it. It felt like watching the movie “Boyhood” all over again (3 hours of nothing).

Life experiences are what make us grow. That’s why autobiographies are normally written by people who are older and have lived extraordinary lives. Conner is neither, his life is still too short for him to come to any meaningful conclusion, and his life was too peaceful to have anything interesting to share like it did with some other YouTubers. I seriously have no idea how he managed to write 224 pages on 22 years of normality.

Making a big deal out of nothing

In the synthesis, it says the book is about ‘ his struggles with identity, body image, and sexuality in his teen years’. The way he presented his problems in the book also made it sound like he had struggled a lot through his teenage years. However, when I read about them, they are just typical struggles nearly all teenagers go through. You can argue that only 10% of teenagers struggles about sexuality. However, his family was completely supportive of him from the get-go, which means he is one of the few very lucky LGBTQ+ people out there.

I’m not trying to say that Conner didn’t struggle through anything or that he had everything handed to him on a plate. I’m not trying to deny that Conner’s life has anything significant to be written about. However, if Conner indeed had anything interesting in his life, he didn’t put them in the book.

Even if he didn’t have anything extrordinary to put in, he could have still made them interesting through his writing and reflections on this ordinary events. Sadly he did neither of these.

Pseudo-profound advise

I understand that Conner considers himself a very deep and thoughtful person, and I don’t disagree with that. However, at age 23 he really doesn’t have anything groundbreaking to share. I personally didn’t get anything from his ‘wisdom’. I’m not “one of those old people who doesn’t understand millennials and look down on them”, I’m younger than Conner, and I don’t consider him more wise or mature than myself reading what he offered in the book. This the same cliche advise that all teenagers have heard over and over again. They are abstract, general, and to be honest, not that helpful.

I understand that Conner considers himself a very deep and thoughtful person, and I don’t disagree with that. However, at age 23 he really doesn’t have anything groundbreaking to share. I personally didn’t get anything from his ‘wisdom’. I’m not “one of those old people who doesn’t understand millennials and look down on them”, I’m younger than Conner, and I don’t consider him more wise or mature than myself reading what he offered in the book. This the same cliche advise that all teenagers have heard over and over again. They are abstract, general, and to be honest, not that helpful.

We know we need to “be ourselves”, we know friends are important, we know real life interactions are important. It’s not something as mind-blowing as Conner made it. Why did I spend money on a book for advice that can be found on Tumblr given by 16-year-old girls?

Conner could have given advice that were more solid. Instead of telling us to be ourselves like so many other people did, he could have told us how exactly to be ourselves. How exactly we can find our interests or passion. Quality is more important than quantity for friends? Everybody knows that! The problem is how to maintain close friendships with the few friends you want to be closed with.

Nonetheless, I do think Conner is an interesting person. Even though I found this book.. uh… boring, it doesn’t mean I’m not looking forward to his next book “Note to self”.

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